Lauren Klein

University of Alabama Talk

Posted by in Data Visualization, Digital Humanities, Early American Literature, Invited Talks

On Wednesday, November 8th, I’ll be giving a talk at the University of Alabama’s Digital Scholarship Center. I’ll be posting the slides from my talk upon my return, but as a preview, here’s John Melish‘s 1822 “Diagram of the United States.” (The David Rumsey Historical Map Collection has a larger version). I’ll also be leading a brown bag the next day, where I’ll discuss the following projects: Ben Rubin and Mark Hansen’s installation piece, Movable Type. Whitney Trettien’s multimodal essay, Plant->Animal->Book Kate Bagnall and Tim Sherratt’s The Real Face of White Australia Martin Krzywinski’s…read more

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CFP: The History and Future of Data Visualization (ASECS 2013)

Posted by in Conference Papers, Data Visualization, Early American Literature

I’m chairing a panel at the 2013 American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies conference. The official call is posted below. Please contact me if you have any questions, or to submit a proposal. American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies (ASECS) April 4-7, 2013 Cleveland, OH CFP: “The History and Future of Data Visualization” (Digital Humanities Caucus) Panel Organizer: Lauren Klein, Georgia Tech According to the New York Times, the “next big thing” for the humanities is data. But scholars of the eighteenth century have long recognized that era as the one in which taxonomical representation…read more

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Two Recent Talks

Posted by in Data Visualization, Digital Humanities, Early American Literature, Invited Talks

I gave two talks in April, both of which have now been archived online. Click here to watch the video of my talk at Georgia Tech’s GVU Center, “Digital Humanities, Data Visualization, and James Hemings.” I gave a related (but distinct) talk at Emory’s Digital Scholarship Commons, “Archival Silence, Digital Humanities, and James Hemings.” You can see an archive of the Tweets here, and a video of the talk here.

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“A Report Has Come Here”

Posted by in Conference Papers, Digital Humanities, Early American Literature, Food Studies

What follows is the full text of the paper that I presented at the 2012 MLA, “‘A Report Has Come Here’: Social Network Analysis in the Papers of Thomas Jefferson,” slightly reformatted for the web. The panel, “Networks, Maps, and Words: Digital-Humanities Approaches to the Archive of American Slavery,” also featured talks by Cameron Blevins, of Stanford University, and Aditi Muralidharan, of the University of California, Berkeley, as well as a response from Amy Earhart, of Texas A&M. I convened this panel out of a desire to address the unique set…read more

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