Lauren F. Klein

Feminist Data Visualization

Posted by in Data Visualization, Digital Humanities, Invited Talks, Media Studies, New Media, Research, Slides

Last week, I traveled to Umea, Sweden, to give a talk on feminist data visualization at Umea University’s HUMlab. The abstract for this talk is as follows (slides are below): Data visualization is not a recent innovation. Even in the eighteenth century, economists and educators, as well as artists and illustrators, were fully aware of the inherent subjectivity of visual perception, the culturally-situated position of the viewer, and the power of images in general—and of visualization in particular—to convey arguments and ideas. In this talk, I examine the history of data…read more

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Talk at Yale

Posted by in Data Visualization, Digital Humanities, Invited Talks, Media Studies

On Thursday, February 27th, 2014, I traveled to Yale to speak about the uses of data visualization, past and present. Trip Kirkpatrick, of the Instructional Technology Group, wrote up a great summary of my talk on the DH Working Group website. (My slides are embedded in that post). I’m hoping to write up a more formal version of my remarks soon.

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The Long Arc of Visual Display

Posted by in Data Visualization, Digital Humanities, Invited Talks, Media Studies, Pedagogy

On November 20th, 2013, I presented a talk at the Penn Humanities Forum on the long arc of visual display. The abstract is as follows: We live in what’s been called the “golden age” of data visualization, and yet, the graphical display of information has a long history, one that dates to the Enlightenment and arguably before. This talk will explore the origins and applications (both historical and contemporary) of data visualization techniques. Drawing from the fields of media history, digital humanities, and information visualization, Lauren Klein will introduce several techniques for…read more

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Origins and Applications of Data Visualization

Posted by in Data Visualization, Digital Humanities, Invited Talks, Media Studies

On Wednesday, November 20th, I’ll be speaking at the Penn Humanities Forum about the origins and applications (both historical and contemporary) of data visualization techniques. The official abstract is as follows: We live in what’s been called the “golden age” of data visualization, and yet, the graphical display of information has a long history, one that dates to the Enlightenment and arguably before. This talk will explore the origins and applications (both historical and contemporary) of data visualization techniques. Drawing from the fields of media history, digital humanities, and information visualization, Lauren…read more

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Lost in the Stacks

Posted by in Archives, Invited Talks, New Media

Last Friday, January 25th, 2013, I was interviewed on Georgia Tech’s student radio station, WREK 91.1, for an episode of “Lost in the Stacks.” Lost in the Stacks– they claim, and I believe to be true– is the “one and only Research Library Rock’n’Roll radio show.” With Wendy Hagenmaier, of GT Archives, and Charlie Bennett, the show’s producer and host (and also of the GT Library), we discussed the myth of the archive, the issue of archival silence, and the future of the archive in the digital age. We also played…read more

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University of Alabama Talk

Posted by in Data Visualization, Digital Humanities, Early American Literature, Invited Talks

On Wednesday, November 8th, I’ll be giving a talk at the University of Alabama’s Digital Scholarship Center. I’ll be posting the slides from my talk upon my return, but as a preview, here’s John Melish‘s 1822 “Diagram of the United States.” (The David Rumsey Historical Map Collection has a larger version). I’ll also be leading a brown bag the next day, where I’ll discuss the following projects: Ben Rubin and Mark Hansen’s installation piece, Movable Type. Whitney Trettien’s multimodal essay, Plant->Animal->Book Kate Bagnall and Tim Sherratt’s The Real Face of White Australia Martin Krzywinski’s…read more

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Two Recent Talks

Posted by in Data Visualization, Digital Humanities, Early American Literature, Invited Talks

I gave two talks in April, both of which have now been archived online. Click here to watch the video of my talk at Georgia Tech’s GVU Center, “Digital Humanities, Data Visualization, and James Hemings.” I gave a related (but distinct) talk at Emory’s Digital Scholarship Commons, “Archival Silence, Digital Humanities, and James Hemings.” You can see an archive of the Tweets here, and a video of the talk here.

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