Lauren F. Klein

Feminist Data Visualization; Or, the Shape of History

Posted by in Conference Papers, Data Visualization, Digital Humanities, Research

What follows is the text of my talk at the 2017 MLA Annual Convention, slightly modified for the web. I spoke on a panel that showcased new forms of nineteenth-century digital scholarship. (Also featured were Mark Algee-Hewitt and Annie Swafford). An essay-length version of the talk is in the works, but since I’m heads-down on my book manuscript at the moment, I’m posting my remarks here. NB: If you’d like to read some of the more design-oriented work I’ve done on the subject, please see my paper from the 2016 IEEE VIS…read more

1

Visualization as Argument

Posted by in American Studies, Conference Papers, Data Visualization, Digital Humanities, Media Studies, Research

What follows is the transcript of my talk, “Visualization as Argument,” presented at the Genres of Scholarly Knowledge Production conference held at the Umea University HUMlab in December 2014. The talk is adapted from an essay-in-progress about the theoretical work of some of the earliest data visualization designers in the United States, who also happened to be pioneering educators and champions (to varying degrees) of women’s rights. My research is concerned, most generally, with the cultural and critical dimensions of data visualization. I’m at work on a book about the history of data…read more

2

Feminist Data Visualization

Posted by in Data Visualization, Digital Humanities, Invited Talks, Media Studies, New Media, Research, Slides

Last week, I traveled to Umea, Sweden, to give a talk on feminist data visualization at Umea University’s HUMlab. The abstract for this talk is as follows (slides are below): Data visualization is not a recent innovation. Even in the eighteenth century, economists and educators, as well as artists and illustrators, were fully aware of the inherent subjectivity of visual perception, the culturally-situated position of the viewer, and the power of images in general—and of visualization in particular—to convey arguments and ideas. In this talk, I examine the history of data…read more

0

Talk at Digital Humanities 2014

Posted by in Conference Papers, Data Visualization, Digital Humanities, Research

What follows is the talk I delivered on behalf of the TOME project team at the Digital Humanities 2014 conference. We’re in the process of writing up a longer version with more technical details, but in the interim, feel free to email me with any questions.  NB: For display purposes, I’ve removed several of the less-essential slides, but you can view the complete slidedeck here. Just over a hundred years ago, in 1898, Henry Gannett published the second of what would become three illustrated Statistical Atlases of the United States. Based on…read more

0

NYPL Blog Post

Posted by in Archives, Early American Literature, Fellowships, Food Studies, Research

Last spring, I spent a month in the Manuscripts and Archives Division of the New York Public Library, conducting research for my food book. I recently wrote a blog post about that experience– and the experience, more generally, of conducing archival research. It’s now been posted on the NYPL blog, and you can read it here. Image at left: Lydia Maria Child, Letter to Ellis Loring, March 9th, 1842. Source: NYPL MssCol 532.

0

Three Research Fellowships

Posted by in Data Visualization, Early American Literature, Fellowships, Research

In more good news, I’m pleased to announce that I’ve been awarded three research fellowships for the 2013-14 academic year. I’ve received the “Drawn to Art” fellowship at the American Antiquarian Society in order to conduct research for my second book, a cultural history of data visualization from the eighteenth century to the present. I’ve also received a one-month Mellon Foundation fellowship from the Library Company of Philadelphia for that project, which I’ll take up in May 2014. In addition, I’ve received a Food Studies Fellowship from the New York Public Library in order to complete a chapter of my…read more

0